The Role of Science and Technology Diplomacy in Preventing Nuclear Proliferation (A Case Study: EU and Kazakhstan)

نوع مقاله : مقاله پژوهشی

نویسندگان

1 Assistant Professor of Political Science at Yazd university, Yazd, Iran

2 Associate Professor of Political Science, Yazd University, Yazd, Iran

3 Master’s Degree in International Relations, Yazd University, Yazd, Iran.

چکیده

Science and technology diplomacy has been considered as one of the influential tools in the international arena by many countries and even trade and political unions. The European Union has also implemented various programs with Central Asian countries. The research question is what are the goals and objectives of EU science and technology diplomacy in Kazakhstan? The results show that EU scientific diplomacy is pursued in two forms: scientific diplomacy based on technology and scientific diplomacy based on the humanities in Central Asia. For example, 4 to 7-year programs have been implemented in Central Asian countries, such as Kazakhstan include biology, genomics and biotechnology for health, information technologies, nanotechnology, knowledge-based multifunctional materials and new manufacturing processes and tools, air and space, food quality and safety. The main focus of the program is on Kazakhstan. The main objectives of these programs appear to monitor the country's nuclear activities with the aim of preventing nuclear proliferation via support from the model of neoliberal economic development, increase the capacity of civil society, and support the soft power of the union. This research will use descriptive-analytical methods and second-hand data collection.

کلیدواژه‌ها


عنوان مقاله [English]

The Role of Science and Technology Diplomacy in Preventing Nuclear Proliferation (A Case Study: EU and Kazakhstan)

نویسندگان [English]

  • Ebrahim Taheri 1
  • Mohammad Abedi Ardekani 2
  • Younes Hadadi Ahangar 3
1 Assistant Professor of Political Science at Yazd university, Yazd, Iran
2 Associate Professor of Political Science, Yazd University, Yazd, Iran
3 Master’s Degree in International Relations, Yazd University, Yazd, Iran.
چکیده [English]

Science and technology diplomacy has been considered as one of the influential tools in the international arena by many countries and even trade and political unions. The European Union has also implemented various programs with Central Asian countries. The research question is what are the goals and objectives of EU science and technology diplomacy in Kazakhstan? The results show that EU scientific diplomacy is pursued in two forms: scientific diplomacy based on technology and scientific diplomacy based on the humanities in Central Asia. For example, 4 to 7-year programs have been implemented in Central Asian countries, such as Kazakhstan include biology, genomics and biotechnology for health, information technologies, nanotechnology, knowledge-based multifunctional materials and new manufacturing processes and tools, air and space, food quality and safety. The main focus of the program is on Kazakhstan. The main objectives of these programs appear to monitor the country's nuclear activities with the aim of preventing nuclear proliferation via support from the model of neoliberal economic development, increase the capacity of civil society, and support the soft power of the union. This research will use descriptive-analytical methods and second-hand data collection.

کلیدواژه‌ها [English]

  • Science
  • technology
  • FPS
  • Central Asia
  • European Union
  • Diplomacy
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